November 4, 2012
ikenbot:

Neutron Suns
This is one of several possible scenarios that happen to a star of either types (I, II, IC). You’re left with a stripped solar mantel, leaving this gorgeous neutron star and or pulsar.

ikenbot:

Neutron Suns

This is one of several possible scenarios that happen to a star of either types (I, II, IC). You’re left with a stripped solar mantel, leaving this gorgeous neutron star and or pulsar.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via abcstarstuff)

1:56am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZR091vWZzpBK
  
Filed under: Astronomy 
August 15, 2012
ikenbot:

Hunt Is On for Gravity Waves in Space-Time
Image: Artist’s impression of gravitational waves from two orbiting black holes. Credit: K. Thorne (Caltech) and T. Carnahan (NASA GSFC)
Because black holes are impossible to see, one of scientists’ best hopes to study them is to look for the ripples in space-time, called gravitational waves, that they are thought to create.
Gravitational waves would be distortions propagating through space and time caused by violent events such as the collision of two black holes. They were first predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity; however, scientists have yet to find one.
That could change when the latest version of a gravitational wave-hunting facility gets up and running. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is actually a pair of observatories, in Louisiana and Washington state, that began operating in 2002. Newly sensitized detectors are being added to both.

ikenbot:

Hunt Is On for Gravity Waves in Space-Time

Image: Artist’s impression of gravitational waves from two orbiting black holes. Credit: K. Thorne (Caltech) and T. Carnahan (NASA GSFC)

Because black holes are impossible to see, one of scientists’ best hopes to study them is to look for the ripples in space-time, called gravitational waves, that they are thought to create.

Gravitational waves would be distortions propagating through space and time caused by violent events such as the collision of two black holes. They were first predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity; however, scientists have yet to find one.

That could change when the latest version of a gravitational wave-hunting facility gets up and running. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is actually a pair of observatories, in Louisiana and Washington state, that began operating in 2002. Newly sensitized detectors are being added to both.

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi, via imagineatoms)

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